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In the beginning...

Updated: Feb 16

It's a new year and for me blogging is a new endeavor, so off we go.


I just returned from the Washington Winter Antiques Show. There were a great group of dealers in a wonderful building - the Katzen Arts Center on the campus of American University.




Now I just have to unpack (pleasantly fewer items than I started with) , do the paper work including sending detailed receipts to each of the purchasers, and get back to work adding new items to the website.


Shows are a wonderful way to interact with potential customers. For me there is nothing better than getting to know the folks who are showing interest and helping them to understand my ceramics. Each piece has a story to tell, whether it's its origin, age, or its decoration.


While it's easy to tell stories about the families whose armorials decorate some of the pieces, it's also fun to tell about where and why pieces were made. This is particularly true of the Japanese Igezara transferware that I've come to enjoy.


For me, it represents a special place in history. It arose out of the desire of the rising merchant and middle classes to own affordable lovely objects following the industrialization of Japan, just as English transferware did following industrialization of Britain.


Here's an example I sold at the show:


Well, back to work unpacking and listing my latest arrivals.


R.J. Ruble

Ericsson Street Antiques

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As hard as it may be to pack up all your goodies and brave the winter weather and the perils of traveling, please remember how much we customers/collectors appreciate your efforts and the finds you bring us, whether at shows or online. We've certainly spent hours of frustration in places that had nothing special to offer, so when we are rewarded by beauty in all of its forms and variations as a result of your extra efforts, your expertise, and your willingness to serve those downsizing, it brings us special joy, and you help us bring such treasures back home to add that special something that enriches our environment and brings pleasure to us and others as well. You al…

Curtir

Love the Igezara!

Curtir
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